Milk Review: Dove Song Dairy (Goat)

I have made yogurt and chevre using Dove Song and have drank it straight. For drinking it has a nice full, creamy mouth feel. Both the texture and taste are slightly more rich and assertive than the average commercial goat milk. It also has a slight, but distinct musky goat hint which I enjoyed. However, when I made yogurt (using my recipe posted here) that hint of goat was greatly multiplied!  It was one of the most musky tasting goat products I’ve ever consumed. I generally prefer a stronger goat flavor – after all it *is* goat milk – but this was too much. I’m sad to say I couldn’t eat it and was worried about ruining baked goods by using it. This goatyness translated better in the chevre I made. It imparted a pleasant goaty profile without being  overwhelming. Such strong flavor can be caused by a number of things including type of breed and milk handling practices. In this case, I have to wonder if there is a buck being kept with the milkers.

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This milk is not for the feint of heart or those who are testing the waters of goat milk. However, if you’re a fan full flavored milk and cheese, give it a try.

I purchased Dove Song goat milk on several different occasions from the Kimberton Whole Foods, Pottstown location. Kimberton carries a range of sizes from pint to half gallon with prices from $2.30 to $6.49. It is consistently in stock and usually has a reasonably far out best buy date.This milk is raw. Depending on where you stand in the raw milk debate, you may need to pasteurize.

Check out their website at http://dovesongdairy.org/

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